Canadian Travellers' Perceptions of the Accommodation Industry

Canadian Traveller’s Perceptions of the Accommodation Industry

In early 2016, the Hotel Association of Canada surveyed 1,500 Canadians about their business and leisure travel. As part of that survey, Tourism HR Canada gathered information on travellers’ perceptions of Canadian hotels as not only a place to stay, but a place to work.

A Place to Stay

Participants were asked to compare the customer service they received at Canadian hotels compared to hotels in other countries. Only 4% indicated they had never stayed at a hotel outside of Canada and were excluded from the following analysis.

Participants responded on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 representing the best customer service globally and 1 representing the worst. In the eyes of most Canadian travellers, Canadian hotels provide good customer service. Seventy-five per cent of respondents gave Canadian hotels' customer service a score of 7 or higher, with 16% ranking Canadian hotels a 9 and 7% giving them a 10. Only 8% ranked Canadian hotels as a 4 or less.

Women viewed the customer service at Canadian hotels slightly more favourably than men. Younger travellers tended to have a more favourable view of the customer service offered than their older counterparts.

When asked if the level of customer service at Canadian hotels had improved compared to three years ago, 12% of respondents felt it was much better, 22% felt it was somewhat better. The majority (60%) felt is was about the same and 6% thought it was somewhat worse. There was little difference between the perception of males and females. Younger travellers were more likely to perceive an improvement in customer service than older travellers.

A Place to Work

As a place of work, participants in the survey felt that Canadian hotels offered an appropriate place of employment for a range of job seekers.

Respondents were asked if they agreed or disagreed that frontline hotel jobs, such as front desk agent, housekeeper, and cook, were appropriate for 18 different types of employment seekers. The types of employment seekers ranged from students looking for part-time work to non-students looking for a job that could support their family.

Respondents were most likely to agree that these types of jobs were appropriate for non-students looking for long-term, full time work and students looking for part-time work during their education. In both cases, 78% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that frontline hotel jobs were appropriate.

Respondents were least likely to agree that these jobs were appropriate for non-students looking to advance their career. For that particular type of employment seeker, only 59% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that frontline hotel jobs were appropriate. For non-students looking to advance their career, 13% of respondents felt frontline hotel jobs were inappropriate and 25% neither agreed nor disagreed.

Overall, there was no type of job seeker for whom a majority of respondents felt that frontline hotel jobs were inappropriate.

The Hotel Association Survey provided Tourism HR Canada with a small snippet of information on the perceptions of tourism as a place of employment. We are currently studying this subject in greater depth with the Conference Board of Canada. Look for the results of this study in the summer of 2016.

For more information on the data collected in the Hotel Association of Canada study, contact research@tourismhr.ca.