2016 Tourism Labour Supply Report Now Available

Tourism HR Canada is pleased to announce the release of the latest update of the Tourism Labour Supply and Demand study, Bottom Line Labour Challenges Threaten Tourism’s Growth. The study found that 240,000 jobs in the tourism sector could go unfilled by 2035 due to a lack of workers. The report is now available from our emerit.ca website.  The national summary is also available as a free download.

The study quantifies the implications of long term demographic and economic trends on the supply and demand for labour in Canada’s tourism sector. The results suggest that labour challenges represent a real and growing threat to reducing the tourism sector’s growth potential. The consequences of the predicted labour shortage, such as lack of investor interest in the sector and inability of tourism sector businesses to meet demand, could cost Canada billions of dollars.
 
With data broken down by industry group, city, province and occupation, highlights of the report include:

• Spending on tourism goods and services in Canada could rise from $167 billion in 2010 to more than $287 billion in 2035
• Labour demand could grow 41% from 1.6 million jobs in 2010 to 2.29 million jobs in 2035
• The growth in labour supply is expected to exceed 25 per cent during the same period
• By 2035, 240,000 potential tourism jobs could go unfilled due to labour shortfalls
• The food and beverage industry could see 102,257 job go unfilled by 2035
• 11.3% of potential jobs in the accommodation industry could go unfilled over the next 20 years
• Projections suggest that rural and remote regions are likely to experience more acute labour shortfalls.

The outlook may seem bleak, but the projected shortfalls are not inevitable. The projections assume that the attractiveness of tourism occupations, job responsibilities, wages, and access to training and education programs will remain constant. This will not necessarily be the case. Action on the part of governments, the industry as a whole, and individual businesses can significantly increase the number of available tourism workers. 

For further information, please contact:
research@tourismhr.ca